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Blog posts tagged with United Kingdom

  • Lessons from a Rubik’s Cube in solving health IT challenges

    Dr Martin Farrier
    December 07, 2017

    The Rubik’s Cube represents a wicked problem, and one that needed a new type of solution. It reminds me of the ultimate wicked problem: healthcare. Read more…

  • Documenting DNR decisions and treatment escalation plans

    Dr Anna Bayes
    November 07, 2017

    In a recent BMJ Open Quality journal article, King’s College NHS Foundation Trust (London, UK) shares its path to a more unified electronic tool to document resuscitation decisions and treatment escalation plans Read more…

  • Improving patient safety with consistent documentation of ward rounds

    Dr Anna Bayes
    October 26, 2017

    NHS Improvement recently issued guidance for best practice in running and documenting ward rounds. Configuration within an electronic patient record (EPR) lends itself to prompting clinicians to check all the key parameters, record decisions and update plans during the ward round Read more…

  • Answering the call for an open approach to healthcare data

    Steve Brain
    October 03, 2017

    The path to digital maturity must be open. NHS England’s national director of operations and information, Matthew Swindells, reinforced the need for an open approach in a recent keynote address. I couldn’t agree more. Read more…

  • Imagine 2030: What technology will do for clinicians

    Dr Anna Bayes
    July 12, 2017

    What will healthcare look like in the year 2030? In a new white paper, experts from the United Kingdom discuss how technology will help clinicians diagnose earlier and intervene more effectively. (Part 1 of 3) Read more…

  • 9 things organisations underestimate or overlook when considering total cost of ownership

    Steve Brain
    June 13, 2017

    It can be difficult for even the most experienced information systems professionals to calculate an accurate total cost of ownership (TCO) for health IT. Here are some questions to ask to make sure you’re not missing some of the most commonly overlooked costs. Read more…

  • 5 ways to continue clinical engagement beyond deployment

    Dr Anna Bayes
    April 20, 2017

    Doctors face huge pressure to be efficient during patient consultations, often less than 10 minutes each. Navigating a new electronic patient record (EPR)* system can strain that precious time and leave clinicians feeling frustrated. Over the years, I’ve seen organisations take some successful approaches to alleviate this pressure by continued clinical engagement beyond deployment. Here are just a few examples. Read more…

  • 4 approaches to achieving digital maturity

    Steve Brain
    April 04, 2017

    Three out of four of the UK’s National Health Service (NHS) Trusts are not running as efficiently, effectively and safely as they could with a fully-functioning EPR. Most people recognise the value of the information revolution, but financial and operational challenges are hampering Trusts’ ability to implement a digital maturity strategy. Here are the most common approaches NHS Trusts take, along with risks and benefits to consider. Read more…

  • 4 tips for turning Luddites into champions for your new EPR 2

    Dr Anna Bayes
    March 23, 2017

    Change is hard. And for people who find it especially difficult to accept advancements in technology (Luddites), the transition to an electronic patient record (EPR) can be a painful experience. But solid clinical engagement strategies can turn the most vocal opponents into your organisation’s strongest advocates. These approaches will prove helpful from the earliest stages of EPR procurement through configuration, deployment and adoption. Read more…

  • The self-perpetuating problem of bed blocking

    Dr Anna Bayes
    March 07, 2017

    As soon as they are clinically ready to leave the hospital, patients start counting the minutes until their discharge. But can you imagine waiting days, months or even years? One UK report shows that some patients wait longer than a year; one patient stayed in hospital for an astonishing 508 days after being fit for discharge. This phenomenon is known as “bed blocking” – a term used to describe when patients stay in the hospital for a non-medical reason. Read more…

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